Denim Brand Review: Stitch’s Jeans

by Jaime on March 3, 2010

Because I don’t have enough resources (or storage space, really) to sample every brand, sometimes I’m lucky enough to have great readers who are willing to share their experiences with us so you can be as informed as possible before buying a different denim line. That’s exactly what’s happening today, as Paula (who has written about her denim before) and new writer Sandy tell you about Stitch’s Jeans.

Paula: Ignorance can be bliss! 
I happened upon Stitch’s jeans purely by accident when I was still a newbie to the world of sample sales. Honestly, what attracted me first was the cheap price on this particular pair of jeans (seriously $59!!).  Of course, this was back in the day when I still possessed some semblance of restraint when it came to the price I was willing to pay for a pair of desired denim – oh how my pocket book (and husband) long for those bygone days! 
Anyway, after being drawn in by the crazy price, I became obsessed with the look of these particular Cherokee bootcut jeans in Crow wash and decided that I had to have them. Ok, so, I bought them having no knowledge of the designer, in complete ignorance of the sizing (I went with my true size), and without a clue about the cut.  Yeah, like that will work out!  However, apparently fashion karma was with me on that day because not only was the fit perfect, but they were and continue to be one of the most unique and cool additions to my denim collection. 
Why, you ask? First, the unique aged wash that gives them that crinkled, lived in look, is done in antique wood barrels at an old laundry facility in Evansville, Wyoming.  The denim undergoes extensive washes using a patented aging process. Also, the unusual indigoes are collected from Europe, Japan and the United States.  And, in an attempt to fuse the Old West with equal parts Rock-n-Roll and Americana, Stitch’s creator, Albert Dahan, added special touches such as brass fittings with an aged patina and a button that has the imprint of an Indian head from the 1880’s antique minted five-cent piece (the button on the men’s Jeans is an imprint of the Buffalo Head from the other side of the 1880’s antique minted five-cent piece) How cool is that??  
Continuing along that theme, all the women’s jeans are named after Native American Tribes and all the men’s jeans are named after US States.  Truthfully, my favorite feature is the aged, antique looking fabric that lines the waistband and pockets! I love special touches like that. 
Subsequent research also uncovered a few interesting pieces of information regarding Stitch’s.  For instance, Stitch’s creator, Albert Dahan, is also the creator of one of my other favorite clothing lines, DaNang;  Albert Dahan and Joe’s Jeans creator, Joe Dahan are brothers; and, Albert and Joe, at one time, sold Sasson Jeans.   
If you want unique, cool, different, try a pair of Stitch’s jeans. Maybe fashion karma will shine on you, too!

Sandy: Stitch’s give me enough room in the upperthigh, while still giving the pants a good shape.  The fabric is hearty(tho thinner with the cords), and it’s obvious a lot of love went intomaking them.  I’m a huge fan of flap back pockets because my butt isrelatively flat, and these give me some oomph there.  The way thebootcuts are styled make my legs look super lean to the knee, but thenflare out perfectly to give my calves some shape.  Oh yeah, and the”stitching” is superb!  The cords have a great deal of stretch to them,too.

Thank you so much to both Sandy and Paula! By the way, I asked the specific sizing for each woman; Sandy is wearing a 27 in both pairs of blue jeans – the Chekore Bootcut in Ryder and Rifle – and a 28 in the Maya Cords in Pomegranate. Paula is wearing a 25 in her Cherokee Bootcut in Crow… and they both look amazing! 


Want a coupon code for Stitch’s (that are already at Sample Sale prices)? You’ll get one on Friday, so stay tuned!

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